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CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00pm EST
their operations within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60'
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00am EST
, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really the csh to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 8:00am EST
introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person addicted to both politics and academic and women's history, i and i'm sure all of us are interested in this presentation so thanks for being here. you couldn't be in a better counter this talky their since much of grand rapids has been very highly invested in the health-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of american health care reform inc
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 6:00pm EST
. anthony dollars, one of the most ill-fated in the u.s. government. it looks just like 1/4. it was only made 79-81 for three years. it was the last regular issued government issued coin they made the san francisco mint uncirculated condition with the proof. it had all kinds of problems. it makes it a commercial failure but makes it a collectable absolutesaffordable at $129 and a customer pick but $109.95 the most affordablen set released by the u.s. government of all the coin sets we have. the 1999 season the anthony. most people do not even know that coin exists. it was not in the proofset and not man said. that coin you gotta individually--mint- set coin! these, $79 apiece.are $109 across the board for everything that you see. >>host: explain where you get numbers. >>guest: i talked about getting individually and the reason is pretty simple. people buy coins individually to build their sets. when i say if purchased individually that is the way most people put their coins together. the coin catalog they are the lord largest coin catalogers kind of the gold standard and has always been
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 12:00pm EST
u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we look at the data, and in our market the security based m
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 11:00pm EST
applications of you as two activities either a director in significant effect in the u.s. commerce for the potential for evasion. we support the goals of title vii which provide great transparency and increased oversight of the swaps market. there is growing concern of the cftc and divergence and the sec regarding the process and timing in the house slots and security base wipes are a furry and declines. as the committee is aware, the industry is facing quickly approaching the highest deadline. without the benefit of final payments with the international scope of these rules. the lack of clarity related to the rules cross-border application manifests itself in particular with respect to three aspects. the cftc sdc to more pressing concerns with the requirements. the first is to has to register as a swap deal or. given the nature register, firms of which make decisions if i look so as to which entities to register with the cftc. making these decisions without being fully informed to the rules that apply in literal take to comply and position untenable love love and predict ability.
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different region
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 9:00am EST
the u.s. institute of peace. he has helped fund schools in darfur in refugee camps, now belongs to a satellite project with george clooney. mr. prendergast has worked for peace in africa for well over a quarter of a century. then we will hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at stanford university's hoover institution, and professor, lecture and african studies at johns hopkins university school of advanced international studies. mr. dizolele has testified several times before the congress. his work has appeared frequently in many major news publications, and he is a frequent commentator on african affairs on television and radio. he served as election monitor in the drc in 2006, and again in 2011. and has also been indicted with united nations peacekeepers as a reporter. in addition, he is a veteran of the united states marine corps. thank you for your service. and i'd like to now go to steve hege. >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, and members of the subcommittee on africa's global health and human rights, thank you for this invitation to testify at the scene on
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 7:00pm EST
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very qui
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the united states changed course, and so at that meeting, truman meets molotov -- first meet with advisers and they're divided. marshall, leahy, are all telling him don't break with the soviets. said to the secretary of war and said, the soviets have a much better understand of their open security, especially around poland, than we do. >> stepping back from the details, do you think it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each of whom had, i think, it's fair to say, an empire, one formal, one a little more informal, because the soviets had different, smaller states under their control, and going to keep control of the baltic states and moving into eastern europe. was it realistic for these two powers, who are very different, to really get along for very long or were they really destined to have a cold war and luckily never really had a hot war except through proxies. so details are important, and who knows
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
time thinking and talking about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico border of 1846. grant said at the time i do not think there was ever more wicked were then that waged by the united states of mexico. i thought so at the time when i was the dexter, only i had not moral courage enough to resign. during the time of the u.s.-mexico war, i just found this are really moving "which is why it took it for my title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. wanted to talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s.-mexico war from being with it -- really enthusiastic and in favor to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to offi
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 11:00pm EST
last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfather
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
defense, history and geography of, and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon pages history of the estates is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart today to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's history of the modern world," which in this case is going to be from 1898 to just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and it's one that which my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great passions of liberty and a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably do know that you are getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my expenses in the rock band were pretty informative. i, student i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and start. when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states" in 2004, we
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
know as american citizens. we certainly should be able to know as u.s. senators working to protect the -- the fourth amendment. mr. president, we have always struck a balance in this country between an overbearing government and the important pathway to obtaining information relevant to our national security. the amendment that i'm laying forth strikes that balance appropriately. it urges the process to continue of providing an understanding of what the secret court interpretations are. that's very important in democracy. it provides the appropriate balance with national security. it gives clear decision-making authority to the attorney general in this process and in that sense, it does the best possible path that honors national security concerns while demanding transparency and accountable for this issue of privacy and protection of the fourth amendment. thank you, mr. president. mr. wyden: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. wyden: how much time for purposes of general debate remains on our side and how much under the control of the distinguished c
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 11:00pm EST
and center on the negotiating agenda. for the u.s. and others in the community support a federal solution the eastern congo with full knowledge this is likely rwanda's primary objective in the first place? stepping back from the current dynamics, federalism and another sub is neither inherently good or bad proposition , but when driven by neighboring state which would benefit enormously from it, federalism can be problematic to say the least. diplomats commonly affirmed everyone they can and must be a part of a solution. which solution i would ask. the rwandan solution for this crisis appears to have been identified well before the shots were even fired. thank you, mr. chairman for the opportunity to share the findings. >> thank you for her testimony. and now mr. prendergast. >> thank you for your extraordinary commitment to the people of the congo. deeply appreciated by everyone in this room. i want to begin by echoing something you said, congressman smith, earlier in the hearing. no one is questioning the hard work and dedication in decades of long commitment to key administrat
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
this miscalculation. people say, well, you know, mutual assured destruction marched between the u.s. and the soviet union. well, if you look at the history, it actually came very, very close a couple of times, particularly on three occasions. one was the cuban missile crisis . another time was actually less well-known, during the yom kippur war. but in the jerusalem post, a book written about this describing how the american and soviet navies were circling watching each other, get so tired, they almost made a mistake and pulled the nuclear trigger and each other. and finally, just sort of more innocent mistakes, if you look at an example in the 1980's, boris yeltsin, the president of russia, the norwegians had a zero weather rocket that they launched in the direction of russia. then notify the russians, but this time the notification got lost in the mail. the russian generals came and said, look, apparently somebody has lost something in us across our horizon. this is an american nuclear attack you have to miss the launch or russia will be obliterated with no shots back. thankfully
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 5:30pm EST
price. >> host: mr. rothkopf, is the u.s. on the right path in your view when it comes to the mix of business and government? >> guest: i think the u.s. has a lot of work to be done in this area. you'd know from just the recent presidential campaign where we spent $6 billion, and that most of that money came in one way or another from companies or people who worked for powerful companies, and was part of a bargain that exists in our society between special interests donors and their political beneficiaries, that their special interests will get pursued. and it's the first big election since citizen is united, where the supreme court ruled that money was speech, and that we couldn't regulate money, and i found that to be a real distortionary fact in u.s. life, and we're coming out of a period in which income inequality has grown more than ever in u.s. history. in which we have had gdp growth but job contraction, and social mobility is going down, and we have to ask ourselves, as companies gain influence, push government off their back in a regulatory base, grow in a free-wheeling way,
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 5:00pm EST
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by m
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00pm EST
series. in it they argue that u.s. leaders must chart a course for the future by first facing what they call the country's troubling history of drifting further away from its democratic traditions. >> host: hello peter and oliver. i've taught with peter at american university. let me start by having both of you talk about the theme of this and how you wrote it? >> guest: i was invited in 1996 to go to this class at american university researching oliver storms america and one of the classes i was very popular. i went very impressed with it and the range of students and afterwards peter suggested that there was a great story about the atomic him in the atomic bomb always fascinated me because i was born the year after it was dropped and it was in new york city, the center of the world and my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scien
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 9:00am EST
and the u.s. -- am optimistic we can make progress. we're making progress by don't think we'll get a national bill to deal with climate change, so that would be top of my agenda. >> assuming the tax reform gets done, i think it's education issues. >> the first thing i would think my bias would be short-term stimulus, long-term deficit reduction, and then immigration reform. and once, if we get past all that, we could have serious conversations about other things. >> that's great. we're going to stay here and we're going to have a quick welcome from jocelyn from fti. she's going to talk to us a little bit more about the polling, the audience polling. she's coming. great. spent then was would do the polling will take questions from the audience. >> aecom everybody. thanks again for being here, and thanks for doing with her technical difficulty. hopefully we are in the click a. so as you can see this is the first poll question that i mentioned, so again, phones and computers at the ready. you can either text or twitch responses to this question. and the first question, as you can see, a
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 2:45pm EST
population the jewish by considerable margin the biggest recipient of u.s. aid $3 billion annually. israel is also an occupying power, born of war in which two thirds of the indigenous population was driven from their land, israel went on to expand its borders further in 1967 when it conquered the west bank, the gaza strip and golan heights. there are half a million jewish settlers in the occupied territories who enjoy all manner of state subsidies and privileges while palestinians under occupation suffer indignities and humiliation too numerous to mention. the situation is not much better for palestinian citizens in israel who are increasingly treated as a fifth column despite their loyalty that the state has shown little affection over the years. israel's occupation is the longest in modern history and the israeli government appears to be in no hurry to end it particularly if it can change the topic to iran's nuclear program or the threat of islam. unconditional support for israel is not the only reason the united states is viewed with suspicion and hostility in much of the arab and musl
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 6:00am EST
>> for state department officials resigned after reports for lack of security at the u.s. benghazi, libya. wittiest ambassador and three other americans were killed. at 8 a.m. eastern the senate foreign relations committee, we will have that on c-span2. later in the day, we will head over to the house side of the capitol. we have live coverage at 1 p.m. eastern here on c-span3. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every of them appear, probably will never happen again in history. it's interesting because after dad was sworn in we went in and took a picture, photo of the family behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexander virginia, suburbia, munich, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we been living there. dad was vice president. i've never forget that night mom was co
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on stuart and rick's book. i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. my name is in the acknowledgments, i found it today, so nobody's come after me yet. laugh and if you think it's insend yea -- incendiary now, you should have read the draft i read. [laughter] i'm one of the few lawyers who did not file a brief in the fisher case. [laughter] okay. so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action. the question in this case is did the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate admission program, and did abigail fisher, was she injured by what the university of texas did? so i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admissions program and what it's supposed to do and what it's not supposed to do and what it does and doesn't do. so we h
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 8:30pm EST
secretary of state for east asia will discuss china's leadership transition and how it might impact u.s.-china relations. on c-span 3 at 5:30 p.m. eastern. >> at the new york state museum. this is our gallery that is dedicated to the history of september 11th and the attacks in new york at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery, to tell the story for the first moments of the attack, using objects and photographs from the world trade center site. this piece of steel from the south tower, floors seven threw nine, we put it in the place where the public can touch it. gives the visitor a tangible experience. this is the piece of steel from the north tower, floors 71 through 74. this is the dramatically bent piece of steel. this is the site of impact on the north tower, and you can see the openings where the windows have been and the pieces of the metal that would have held aluminum on the front of the building. every piece of steel is marked so you know which building, which floor, which side of the building it's on. we researched that after we took in some steel. this one we f
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
myth of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drasticall
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 9:30am EST
talk about in the u.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network of, for instance, vice president dick cheney. whether it's halliburton, other companies, they ended up unfairly taking up these and they didn't do a good job at all by virtue of the result -- [inaudible]. these can networks -- another can of such network, if you would like to look at the much bigger scale, the entire seven to $800 billion bailout is a function of a very quote unquote legal state business network that operates that allows our system to bail out people that have caused the problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria. the money is much smaller, and the checks and balances that what is the media or the democratic process, and other civil society associations and power centers is absent, completely absent. so even though the pot is smaller, divided
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 6:00pm EST
been a career army officer for a period in the u.s. army and served in world war ii and korea and later became a hospital administrator. >> so you say conservative, orthodox conservative reform? >> right in the middle. >> did you fight in the 1967 war? >> i was a kid. >> you were a kid. did you fight any war? >> i fought in a couple of them, yes. i fought in the lebanon war. i was quite involved in the lebanon war. i served in the israeli paratroopers. i was in the israeli special forces. >> what year? >> june 1982. wars in the middle east occurred in june, almost to the day. it's probably a good war- fighting weather. i was among the first forces to -- of israeli forces to enter the city of beirut in june 1982. my actual unit was decimated in an ambush and we ended up being attached to all sorts of other units for the duration of the war. later on, i became one of the few israelis to be a veteran of the gulf war. in a period just before the outbreak of the gulf war, i was assigned as a strategic liaison between the army and the u.s. fleet. in the book, i went out that israel had repeat
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 12:00pm EST
had been hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 6:00am EST
u.s. delegation to dubai where we worked together to defend free and open internet. i would note that members of committee staff on a bipartisan basis were there as well and we are fighting for internet freedom and openness. the situation in dubai right now is food, people are -- we have a strong american delegation on the ground led by ambassador kramer and including representatives from across government and the private sector. the situation is fluid. the issues are important and i think we all understand that this will not be the last conference at which these important issues arise and fighting for internet freedom and openness is something we will all be working on together for quite some time. in the u.s. the broadband sector is strong and the u.s. has regained global leadership in mobile communications. we have more healthy subscribers than the rest of the world combined, and setting the pace globally on innovation and no software apps and devices. this means we face a particularly acute challenge to meet exploding mobile demand, the spectrum crunch and we must use all pol
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 5:00pm EST
important day it is for the u.s. coast guard. our communities who benefit from those services, the men and women who answer the call to serve. the reason i say that is because we have passed a bill that gives 40,000 active-duty coast guard members the support they need. it is a worthy tribute to a force of men and women that in 2000 alone helped us save over 3,800 lives across the u.s., confiscated over 166,000 pounds of cocaine and secured over 472 vessels before they arrived at our ports. this legislation will give the coast guard the funds that it needs to upgrade equipment and purchase the right vessels for carrying out every mission that they need. this kind of work exemplifies the heroes like chief petty officer terrell horn of california. officer horn died in the line of duty last week while tracing drug smugglers off the coast of california. our thoughts are with his family and friends. his actions and service remind us of the danger that the task of the men and women of the coast guard do on a daily basis. and that's why it was so important that we pass this reauthorization bi
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 8:00pm EST
president's eldest grand son to talk about the inspiration for his trip at 9 p.m. eastern. >> u.s. intelligence officials said wednesday that the syria military head loaded the precursor chemicals for a deadly nerve gas into bombs, and, thursday, a bipartisan group of senators expressed support for the obama administration's regime over the use of bilogical weapons. senators spoke to reporters for 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator lieberman, senator coons, and senator graham, and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weaponnized stores of chemical and bilogical agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggest they are in waiting quarters waiting to use the weapons. in true, this may men that the united states and our allies facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction in syria, and this may be the last worng we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close, and we may instead be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:25pm EST
salvation army and changing the role in the u.s.. islamic the salvation army which many people don't realize is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside of department stores in the christmas season it's what they call the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas especially impoverished areas would have parades' and make lots of malaise the symbols trying to attract especially the urban poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the case
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 10:00am EST
for 1924, the first one done by a team from the u.s. army air corps, eight men and four planes. so that guaranteed somebody would finish. it was that dangerous. several other national teams trying to do it. the good news was, none of them were killed, but the best it -- bad news was not be finished. was quite difficult in the early open cockpit planes. you would feel the weather, whatever was, all the way around the world. so there were these attempts to go around and fly around the world. in fact, very quickly by the 1930's somebody does it within eight days which is kind of an amazing record. and it is hard to break that if you go faster it is not quite the endurance test of trying to keep awake as much as you would need to fly around the world. if you do it's slower, who cares to read what happens with that a day record being said is people start to notice that it is not really what we would call a great circle, the equivalent of an equator. people were sticking to the northern hemisphere where they could cast basically. amelia earhart said, well, i'm going to do it around the e
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:00pm EST
look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were pe
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30am EST
see a discussion on how u.s. debt slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to a new phase of political and economic development. event is hosted by the american enterprise institute in washington. you can see it live, 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. just the channel to the ability find surprises. every month or every year i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that a don't think you could have ever imagined. if you come to me and say mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or the show with the duck guy, or certain food channel network, i don't think that if i had to predetermined that was my practicum i would've ever picked that. but the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i think it gets sold short we get the techno- ecstatic
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:15am EST
that the first wave of troops were u.s. marines. they wanted to bring their own helicopters, the own logistics. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security team and senior people at the state department, over the whole question of what is it wise to try to broach potential peace talks with the taliban. we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting a common person to try to achieve the present school in the country. >> who is summer? >> so, she is a young american woman who come and there she is on the bottom right, who had extensive foreign development experience and put her hand up to go to afghanistan. to
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 6:00am EST
hundred remaining. if u.s. someone in your last they wanna get a great cake for this purpose.qc is doing 80 shows a lot and you see that we eat a bite of something and we all eat anymore.ish this one that some good these are. h year at the beginning december and will make sure everything is fresh and after- hours bakerycrs bakery we would make sure every one is great. >>host: take advantage of this great by today you'll be so glad you did and we do not get to do free shipping on these cakes could you realize how expensive that is. we of only try the cheesecake and everybody loves is a smooth and creamyxture, the crust is about the best that i tasted it is just delicious this is a customer review. >>guest: my mom cheesecake queen and i get nervous because we make small batches we only put 25 and we make cheesecakes for ourselves and the gap a bottle elite 25 at a time and my mother walks in the kitchen and she will find the one because she has the mothers and 10 up. she will ask what is up with a cheesecakes over there and she is the best. she brings more recipes for cheesecake. my
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00am EST
reporter covering the u.s. military for "the wall street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 12:30pm EST
problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 12:00pm EST
fifth of the u.s. economy and competition seems to be at the wrong level impatiens are frustrated. the other reason i wrote the book is doctors are getting crushed right now. they've got declining medicare payments come increasing overhead. hospitals have more expenses. malpractice rates are going up. the burnout rate in health care is 40%. doctors are getting crushed right now and i felt like we need to voice out there and it's okay to talk to the general public. >> host: so you make the point that medical mistakes if you alert the third leading cause of death in the united states. that is a shocking figure. can you talk about? >> guest: it was shocking for me if somebody interested in this field of quality to see you put in that way. medical mistakes are number three. we kill as many people from medical mistakes as we do from car accidents and other causes of death in the u.s. i never thought of it that way because we don't talk as openly and honestly about mistakes as we showed in our profession to be very blunt. you think about number one, heart disease. number one cause of de
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
could deliver a major boost to u.s. economic growth. i realize that many of our colleagues have different priorities when it comes to fixing our broken immigration system, but the reforms contained in the stem jobs act enjoy bipartisan support. so i would urge my colleagues, let's show the world that we can agree on this common sense, bipartisan immigration reform. let's do something for our economy and let's take this first step in our broken -- solving our broken immigration system. now, let me say, before i turn the floor over to my colleague from kentucky, who i know has some comments on this topic, let me address two issues quickly and that is, i can anticipate hearing from some of our colleagues, this doesn't solve all of what's broken in our immigration system and i concede that that's correct. but what we need more than anything is to develop some confidence-building measures for the american people to demonstrate that we can come together, republicans and democrats alike, and do what needs to be done, which everybody -- almost everybody agrees is common sense, and then
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 7:30am EST
house of representatives. three years later in 1962 was elected to the u.s. senate where he would serve for five decades, the second longest tenure in this chamber. i am honored to have served with senator inouye throughout my entire senate service. he and i often found ourselves on different sides when it came to issues always knew him to be a man of principle and decency and i never doubted his commitment to the people of his state, and doing what he believes is right. one of the few times we find ourselves on the same side came from the late senator ted stevens asking as both for help when his character was called into question. politically speaking participating in senator stevens's trial held no benefit for senator inouye. it would have been easy for senator inouye to deny his friend's request and blamed him for it. that was not house senator inouye operated. rather than letting a friend and for himself, senator inouye showed great loyalty and characteristic integrity in his willingness to testify to his friend's good character, put his own reputation on the line in service of a fr
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 2:00pm EST
place. the old economy has, since 1980, for example, in the u.s. doubled in size. it's twice as big now as the economy was -- well, actually, 125% growth since 1980 in the u.s. economy. and during that time jobs have fled our borders, life satisfaction has flatlined, poverty has mounted and inequality have mounted dramatically, environment has declined, the labor movement has lost a lot of members, and i think there's a, you know, a growing realization that, um, this issue of equity and fairnesses in our society is something that we need to bring environment and labor together on in a more vigorous way. if you think about it, one of the oldest -- [inaudible] in environmental performance is to try to get the prices right by internalizing the externalities and eliminating government subsidies. if we really pushed, um, this idea of getting the prices right, prices would go up. and you've got about half the country, half the families in the country who are struggling to get by, half the families in the country can't raise $2,000 to meet some emergency need in 30 days, the estimate is. a
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
your mind of world war ii. i'll make a couple of suggestions. you might try picturing a burning u.s. warship at pearl harbor. or if you'd rather do a happier image, how about a man kissing a woman, leaning and kissing a woman in times square in new york on the third day. or maybe you prefer politics. how about churchville, stalin and roosevelt a filter sitting down together. maybe that image. or maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese american
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
the u.s. military particularly the air force defeated geography in the balkans. it turns out the army did well despite of, and the successful conclusion to the war in bosnia and kosovo were a factor in allowing nato to expand to the black sea although nobody really wrote to that. and what is really the success of the balkans and a panel and we were bloodied to bits in somalia that made people think we can do anything. and that's when geography got its revenge in the mountains and the desert sahara and afghanistan because the transformative moment for me i was embedded with the first battalion of the marine. en and coo eight in march of 2004 we were making an overland journey with several hundred miles to fallujah and it wasn't yet on the news, the battle of fallujah was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah and all we did this transport one marine battalion from one place to another, it wasn't particularly dangerous, but the statistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water models, tool kits, the meals ready to eat. it was just immense logistical exercise
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30pm EST
or an immigrant present within families than other groups in u.s. society, sow how can it approach immigrants rather than immigration policy may be decisive. there was a great commentary, a republican analyst who said, the republican party did really well on latino leaders but not on latino followers, and if you look at it in fact the two governors were latino in this country are both republican. who of the three senators who are latino are republicans. republicans have not down so badly on recruiting latino politicians. we could not have said ten years ago -- democrats were on their ware but the republicans have caught up. and it's catching up relative the support they have gotten from the latino electorate. so is there a difference between latino leaders and supporters. does this look forward the fact that the republican party is getting ahead of the game and will do better in the future, othe fact the republicans have made inroads and still unable to attract latino votes and the converse for democrats. can the feel it's a strong base of latino voters or should democrats be worri
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 1:00am EST
policy issue that we've been facing the last couple years, fallen soldiers, dead u.s. soldiers, even arriving in their caskets in dover. should those be shown? >> guest: i would say they absolutely should be shown. what happened is the reason why a picture of somebody facing dpet is so prevalent, and i argue it appears across the landscape of unsettled difficult events about which there's no consensus, the reason this kind of picture has arrisen with such widespread youth is because we're uncomfortable with pictures of death, and i think that that is something we have to think about. if our news events involve death, death of military, victims, death of people who are dying in tsunamis and earthquakes, then why shouldn't we see them? we see pictures of death in the fictional spaces, on television, in film, we see them on the internet; yet, we're not comfortable about seeing them in the news, and i think that is worthying about. >> host: professor of communication here at the university of pennsylvania, published by oxford, "about the die: how images moves public." this is booktv on c
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 9:00am EST
things like nepa, environmental permitting so that all of the federal u.s. dot agencies can serve as a one dot agency and streamline and find that the processes and environmental documents can be conned currently delivered and accepted from one agency to another. they are good at it. we have found some efficiencies and streamlining. i think we can expand that to federal rail administration and continued to great success. the other issue we have had is needing consistence guidance from federal rail on the buy american program. we wholeheartedly agree with and encouraged by america, manufacturing created in the united states, and to continue to grow our nation's economy in that way. at we are in a transitional period and we've had some challenges in trying to get waivers for as much as five months on a cliff for a real-time. that probably shouldn't have taken that long as we're in this transitional period. so figuring out how to accommodate the goal by america but finding a way to get there in a transition period i think would be good. i know i'm out of time, or to enclose. i would just
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 8:30pm EST
archives? >> guest: the u.s. is actually good. the u.s. is better than many european countries and generally speaking the u.s. archives are easy to use. the cia archives are harder to use. i would actually argue they could be -- you don't want to show from the last 20 years but i know people who have had trouble getting access and in the 40s and 50's. the national archive, i haven't actually worked in the american archives with some friends abort there. i know it's not hard to use. c-span: go back to where you started this book in 1944 and go to 1956. how did the soviets takeover eastern europe? what did they use? you mentioned a lot of stuff earlier but specifically? .. what he did to make sure that he had enough influence, because he set up -- i'll choose three institutions in particular that he felt were important. number one was the secret police. he created domain of these countries, the red army in conjunction with the kgb, secret police forces speaking the local languages. sometimes people coming from the soviet union, sometimes for natives, and began turning them in at this
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 12:00pm EST
the dollar is not a safe haven it is in worse shape than europe collectively than the u.s. states are in worse shape collectively in the federal government and the year rose own economy. we might not be in worse shape than greece but when you take germany and everybody else and put them in one community we are in worse shape than they are and we get the benefit of the doubt. we are the safe haven and people think that everything is okay because they know that we aren't going to defend because you can print money. when they realize printing is worse than defaulting because the potential for the loss is even greater then we are going to see a big spike in the interest rates and that is when we have our crisis because either the fed allows the rates to go up, and who knows how high they might have to go. let's say 10 percent in order to stop the implosion of the dollar and put an end to inflation. if we have a $20 trillion national debt when that happens that would require us to shell out $2 trillion a year of interest payments. where are we going to get that? that all of the tax. >> you
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